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New environmental requirements in impact for trucks servicing Port of Vancouver VANCOUVER, B.C.– The Vancouver Fraser Port Authority stated environmental requirements for container trucks serving the Port of Vancouver will have an instant effect on air quality and public health in B.C.’s Lower Mainland. Starting Aug. 1, the approximately 1,750 trucks signed up in the authority’s truck licensing system are needed to have either a diesel oxidation driver or diesel particle filter set up on cars with 2006 design engines or older, or access to port facilities will be rejected. Up until now, around 100 trucks have been declined access to the port. Trucking business and independent owner-operators need to supply confirmation of their truck engine age or proof that the retrofits have been set up on older models. “The Vancouver Fraser Port Authority has a variety of programs to reduce emissions and enhance regional air quality,” stated Peter Xotta, vice-president, preparation and operations at the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority. “Updating the port’s truck fleet is simply one method we are adding to efforts that deal with climate change and secure the health of local people.” The port authority said trucks with engines constructed because 2007 with diesel particulate filters produce 90% less diesel particle matter than older engines, while those built in 2010 onwards are known to produce 20 times less nitrogen oxide. In 2008, the Port of Vancouver was the first port in Canada to implement such ecological requirements on container trucks, which became part of the provincial and federal governments 14-point Joint Action Plan in 2014 to create exactly what the authority called a more steady trucking market …

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Raiders of the lost fuel receipt Treasure is defined as a concentration of riches, frequently ancient in origin, thought about lost and/or forgotten till rediscovered. For a fleet tax supervisor, no treasure is as extremely prized as a fuel receipt. It’s our Spanish doubloon or piece of eight, and when one goes missing it can set off a frantic search that would put Indiana Jones to pity. Let me describe. Under the International Fuel Tax Contract (IFTA), you require a legitimate invoice or invoice order to validate that tax was paid on the fuel you put into your commercial vehicles. Without a receipt, you’re entrusted two choices. You can pay fuel tax twice (once at the pump and once again on the IFTA return because you’ll need to state the purchase as non-tax paid fuel), or you can bury your head in the sand and pay the tax plus charges and interest when an auditor discovers your error. Either way, you’re going to stroll the slab unless you have a valid fuel receipt. Why you require a receipt The entire concept behind IFTA is to disperse tax to territories based on where your automobile consumes its fuel. When you purchase more fuel than you utilize in any one territory, you get a fuel tax credit given that you paid more than you actually owe. Buying less fuel than you consumed in a jurisdiction implies the jurisdiction is due more tax. Invoices are like a dotted line on a treasure map, detailing how much fuel you bought and where you bought it. In the olden days, they were hand-scrawled on paper. Today, invoices are printed on little slips at the pump or register, or sent out digitally from a fuel distributor. Heck, you can use your phone to snap a picture of a fuel receipt or billing and utilize the digital image to support your claim. Technology has changed a lot of things, however no matter what a fuel invoice appears like, it must consist of particular info in order to stand proof of tax paid. This consists of the date of purchase, cost, the amount of fuel purchased, the seller’s name and address and information …
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