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Central Oregon Truck makes Finest Fleet list, once again

Meet Cale Pearson Title: President and primary running officer, Central Oregon Truck Co. Age: 38 Born: Bakersfield, California Education: Bachelor’s degree in business administration with a management concentration, California State University, Bakersfield Household: Spouse, Meghan, and their two kids Profession: Started in the household contractor structure houses, then handled his father’s lube shop and air-quality test station in Bakersfield. After college, managed shipping agreements and rate negotiations for Elk Corp., a maker of roofing shingles in Shafter, California, and a customer of Central Oregon Truck Co. Relocated to Redmond in 2004 and to Powell Butte last year. Quote: “The first time we came here, I think it was August, we were kinda drawn to the location. We’re very active, my spouse and I, and our boys are active. Simply the overall lifestyle, truly, drew us here.” Trucking in Central Oregon – Trucking companies used 846 employees in September – Trucking jobs peaked post-recession at 950 in June – Trucking companies paid $3.6 million in wages in 2014 – Average wage at a truck company was $45,775 in 2014 – Trucking business in 2014 were short 38,000 motorists across the country. Source: Oregon Employment Department, American Trucking Associations Cale Pearson, president and chief operating officer of Central Oregon Truck Co., and 3 Kenworth trucks are parked at the business terminal in Redmond. Truck driving isn’t exactly what it was when motorists needed to search for a roadside phone booth to call their dispatchers. Today, dispatchers track every big rig’s place using GPS. Electronic screens send information on engine performance back to the company. Semitrucks built for the long run had walk-in sleeper cabs, devices and bunk-space for two. At Central Oregon Truck Co., the printers matter but so do the men and ladies who drive them, stated Cale Pearson, company president and chief running officer. That’s why in March, the 24-year-old Redmond …
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Central Oregon Truck makes Finest Fleet list, once again

Meet Cale Pearson Title: President and chief running officer, Central Oregon Truck Co. Age: 38 Born: Bakersfield, California Education: Bachelor of Science degree in contractor administration with a management concentration, California State University, Bakersfield Family: Better half, Meghan, and their 2 children Profession: Started out in the household company structure homes, then handled his father’s lube store and air-quality test station in Bakersfield. After college, managed shipping contracts and rate settlements for Elk Corp., a maker of roof shingles in Shafter, California, and a customer of Central Oregon Truck Co. Transferred to Redmond in 2004 and to Powell Butte in 2014. Quote: “The first time we came here, I think it was August, we were kinda drawn to the location. We’re really active, my better half and I, and our kids are active. Just the overall lifestyle, truly, drew us here.” Trucking in Central Oregon – Trucking business utilized 846 workers in September – Trucking tasks came to a head post-recession at 950 in June – Trucking business paid $3.6 million in incomes in 2014 – Typical wage at a truck company was $45,775 in 2014 – Trucking business in 2014 were brief 38,000 motorists nationwide. Source: Oregon Employment Department, American Trucking Associations Cale Pearson, president and chief operating officer of Central Oregon Truck Co., and 3 Kenworth trucks are parked at the company terminal in Redmond. Truck driving isn’t really what it was when motorists needed to look for a roadside phone booth to call their dispatchers. Today, dispatchers track every eighteen-wheeler’s place utilizing GPS. Electronic displays transmit data on engine efficiency back to the business. Semitrucks developed for the long run had walk-in sleeper taxis, home appliances and bunk-space for 2. At Central Oregon Truck Co., the devices matter but so do the men and women who drive them, said Cale Pearson, company president and chief running officer. That’s why in March, the 24-year-old Redmond company, obtained in August 2013 by Texas-based Daseke Inc., was named one of the 20 best fleets to drive for by the Truckload Carriers Association. It’s the third year in a row the business has made the designation, which is based upon a driver survey and a business evaluation by Carriers Edge, an Ontario, Canada, firm that focuses on truck-driver training. “First, (the business) has to be nominated by among their workers,” said Mark Murrell, Carriers Edge co-founder. “It’s distinct from other programs because someone needs to speak up on their behalf.” Carriers Edge collects details on the company’s pay, advantages, personnels policies, “the total work experience,” Murrell stated. It also examines the business’s security record, retention numbers and other data. It administers an online, anonymous study of the company’s motorists, to which majority of Central Oregon Truck’s 293 drivers responded. The study also enables drivers to input on their work. “A number of things that we’ve seen in the previous year or 18 months is a huge shift in motorists staying linked in an online capacity,” Murrell stated. “There are more demands for communications through mobile (phone) apps or to be part of virtual conferences” online. Central Oregon Truck gets high marks from its drivers because category, he stated. The firm presented its own mobile app, for instance, that enables motorists to track their pay and benefits, their trip history and upcoming tasks. At the company headquarters on NE Hemlock Avenue, incoming motorists toss their secrets to a concierge who readies the car for the next trip. Inside, they can consume at a delicatessen, grab a shower, exercise in a business fitness center or capture up on their sleep in one of 2 motel-style over night rooms. The company likewise constructed a training bay where new motorists learn to properly strap down and cover a flatbed-trailer load while wearing safety belt linked to overhead tracks. In 2011, Central Oregon Truck Co. considered vacating state. In response, the city of Redmond and the Oregon Department of Transportation together pledged about $495,000 for enhancements to U.S. Highway 97 near the Hemlock Opportunity site where the company built a 27,000-square-foot headquarters. The business likewise took advantage of state enterprise zone tax breaks. Carl Cleem, 56, a motorist for 40 years, 24 of them with Central Oregon Truck Co., said he’s constantly wanted to be a long-haul trucker. He’s driven all over the nation for Central Oregon Truck and today drives a West Coast route, he stated. “Among the things that I really like about Central Oregon (Truck Co.) is the equipment. We get a new truck every two years,” Cleem stated from the roadway. “I just got one in February. This one has a refrigerator, and, obviously, I have my own coffee pot, microwave and television. They make it actually convenient for you to survive on the roadway.” Cale Pearson, Central Oregon Truck Co. president and chief operating officer, sat down April 1 with The Bulletin to address questions about the business. Here are his reactions, modified for length and clarity: A: Not any more however when I was adulting, I raced four-wheelers; I raced go-carts for numerous years; I raced late-model cars in Bakersfield. My name’s Cale; I was named after (NASCAR Hall of Famer) Cale Yarborough. Q: Exactly what type of clients do you deal with and what type of freight are you transporting for them? A: A great deal of it is developing products based in the Northwest. We transport a great deal of lumber, and anything, actually, going into a home or business building. We do a lot of roof; we do siding. (We haul) a great deal of steel products, either flat steel or coiled steel, rebar. We do some machinery, not a lot; we’ll do some things in the aerospace market, not a ton however a little bit there. We’ll do some vehicle-related stuff, some completed products. A: Most likely just about 25 percent. We truly attempt to keep our customer base varied. 2014 was most likely one of the best years from a demand viewpoint, where we were needed because a huge part of that was the oil and gas industry. There was a lot of pipeline, a lot of machinery being moved, a lot of drilling going on, so there’s a lot of freight that moves because of that industry. A: It simply returns to having a varied client base, having fantastic relationships and collaborations with all of our clients and having enough customers across the country that we do not ever go out over our skis. We’re not going to grow by HALF, but we have actually had some pretty good development. In 2014, we grew by 20 percent. That was a pretty good number for us. Q: In terms of the real estate industry, what’s your outlook on for how long the present situation will last? A: Among the important things I’m hearing is that housing starts are going to be somewhere between 1.2 million and 1.3 million this year, and that’s a better number than we were at several years back. That’s the nice aspect of us, too, being an over-the-road, 48-state carrier. Being based here does not always hurt us because we had the ability to go where the loads were going and still get our drivers house and still satisfy the contracts we have with them in terms of home-time and pay. If Southern California’s hot, we can go there; if it’s not, the freight doesn’t go there. A: In the beginning there was all this fear over innovation, right, like in anything. Today the drivers love it. In the old days, you had a logbook; you had to draw your line if you were on task, or not driving or whatever, so it was genuine easy making simply a clerical error. And then you get dented at the scale since you didn’t draw the right line, or return on task or whatever. Now with the (electronic logbook) it’s all digitally tape-recorded so it gets rid of that headache for the driver, and they like it. A: The average, the goal, is 10,000 miles per truck, per motorist, for every month. This is where all our trucks are right now. If you take a look at the information out there, it’s either somewhat above or right at average. A: 1.8 years. Historically we have actually done 5 years, however the last couple of years we have actually gone to a four-year lease cycle, just for the capability to have new innovation. Kenworth did a design change. (He mentioned the window.) If you see this truck present, it’s a T-680. For motorist comfort, that’s a much better truck. It’s a much bigger taxi. They phased out the 660, and for driver comfort we stated we’re going to go all in on this brand-new design. Our highest guys can stand up in those. Which’s a double bunk, so if they want to take their kid with them or their spouse, they each have a bunk. So it truly boiled down to driver comfort, giving them more features … a fridge in there, more area, more storage, more resting capacity. A: Over half of our drivers have actually been here a year or more. That’s kind of the mark we take a look at. The market is usually trending 100 to 110 percent (turnover), because exactly what takes place is you have that bottom third of your labor force that turns over often. Those are the people that you’re speaking about are constantly trying to find a better opportunity and not sticking it out. In 2015, we were at 84 percent. In any normal industry, that seems like insane numbers. A: Yeah, it’s twofold. The business needs to submit a survey. They go into details of what their pay plan is, what their facilities are, what opportunities there are for driver development, what’s our advantage structure, exactly what’s the average turnover, typical wage, typical miles, really the whole gamut. Actually, it’s like an open book, giving them all this details to get involved with and compare these (companies). Once you go through that and we send as a business, then they send a link to the driving team. It’s an anonymous study, so there’s no worry of stating, ‘I don’t desire them to know that.’ It’s a truthful survey. We have no idea who said what. A: Our average in 2014 was simply over $56,000 for all drivers. Our top person made about $80,000. We’ve got people that reside in Florida, Tennessee, Connecticut, Texas, a lot in the West, obviously, however they’re sort of spread all over. We pay 100 percent of the employee’s healthcare, medical, vision and dental. On our 401(k) we have, if a staff member puts in 5 percent (of revenues), we put another 4 percent on top of that. It’s right away vested, which is pretty uncommon in our market. Local meteorologist Russell Bird was discovered dead in his apartment or condo in Bend Tuesday, News Channel 21 revealed Wednesday. … more
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